Summer Update and Spring Scentsation

It never fails to amaze me how incredibly fast summer comes and goes.  And how little painting I  actually accomplish from the first of August to the middle of September.  When the sun is out I am out.  Revelling!  This year we have had an amazing amount of family visiting - and we took the time to cherish each moment knowing how fast it goes. 

Fast, except maybe for the work on this painting "Spring Scentsation".  Yes, I finally came up with a name that is sticking. And I think it is finally about the halfway mark.

white lilac painting Spring Scentsation by Helen Shideler

Often I start projects without really knowing what I am doing. I do have a plan but am unsure if it the right one. But I go with it!  And I promise, I am learning.  I tinted the canvas all over because I do not like those little white holes (misses) that may appear as I apply the first few layers of paint.  Adding to the changes to my approach, I painted a foundation layer to the background first.  At about the halfway mark, i got brave enough to figure out how to approach and modify the background.  That work in now done - however, I will be going back in to deepen and glaze the area around the bloom.

With my next painting I will be changing my approach once again. 

Rational thinking?

This is a large painting - 30 x 48" and I think it may be a new favourite size.  Honestly, I do not think smaller works take less time - just that your "mistakes" may be less obvious as they are smaller?   Is that rational thinking?

Summertime at our house

Always includes as much family as possible, good food and friends whenever possible. This year was no exception. Our house was coming apart at the seams. Joyful sounds. Good meals. And grandchildren that fill the house!

My Post (2).jpg

On the Fence

crow painting On the Fence by Helen Shideler

I did manage to get another crow painting in. This little 10 x 8” oil is a study for a much larger painting in the future - I got caught up a bit too much in the details for a painting of this size. Must remember to simplify going forward.
 

Next post will be from beautiful BC

until next time may your days be colourful

Country Garden Favourite

Country Garden Favourite is a traditionally painted watercolour of hollyhocks

Hollyhocks and mallow were a couple of my mothers favourite flowers. And I guess, seeing them through her eyes as a child helped me to gain an appreciation for them as well. I always associate them with an old fashioned country garden.  I truly love these blooms for their beauty and the nostalgia.  No wonder I love to paint them.

Country Garden Favourite hollyhock painting by Helen Shideler

They bring me back to Cape Breton

Good memories.  Salty air. Sunshine.  Wonderful memories of a place that was truly wonderful to be a child in. There is another flower that takes me back there  as well - wild blue flax.  This past summer, I saw it growing in PEI.  I was so happy to see them.  The colour is amazing.

 Speaking of blue

I knew when I started this painting that I wanted to paint the background as sky blue, rather than the background in my reference photos.  The background in the photos was rather dull and I wanted this painting to be crisp and to feel like a warm summer's day.  For fun I googled "Blue Sky” colour.  This really cool page came up in Wikipedia.  So many shades of blue.  So many shades of sky.  

Originally my plan was to do this painting as a poured watercolour.  I changed my mind for a few reasons.  One I was running out of masking compound and two, I wanted to keep the petals delicate and soft.  Pouring can give you hard edges.  There is a way around that, but it requires applying the mask on damp paper.  And maybe three, I often like to draw as I go.  When you pour it is much easier to have your drawing mapped out.  It is really easy to get lost without a careful rendering.

Hope you enjoy this painting as much as I enjoyed working on it.

Whiter Shade of Pale? Lighter Shade of Pale?

 

Currently I am working on two watercolors simultaneously.  They both happen to be paintings of primarily white flowers. The flowers are quite different from each other in complexity.  The roses are far more intricate than the azalea and drawing them out took far more time (and I might add – patience).  The azaleas allow for more freedom, both with the initial sketch and the application of the paint. Not as many overlapping shapes or fringy petals.

Interesting though, at first glance you would describe both of these flowers as being white.  And really, once you really look at them, there is really very little white about them, other than one’s first impression. (really.. really… really)

This is what truly fascinates me about painting.  Time and time again I step back and marvel at the color possibilities when I embark on a new project.  I determine my palette up front and make adjustments usually after the first petal has had an application of paint.

I have a notebook that I journal the palette for each painting.  This is most helpful as quite often, when a painting is 2/3rds complete, I abandon it for a while and start another – until it reaches the same stage and I go back and complete the first painting.

And so, the most difficult part of painting is the naming convention.  Where to start? Want it to be identifiable to the painting.  And yet, so often the name is a nice name.  Right now I am stuck on a “Whiter Shade of Pale” sounds melodic, eh?  Oh wait – it is beautiful song by Procol Harum.  And I need a second name for the “other” white floral…thinking “Shades  of White”.