Repairing the Rigging and some really good news

This past summer the Tall Ships visited Saint John as part of Canada's 150 Birthday celebrations.  It was a magical, majestic site and made you proud to live here.  I was completely fascinated by the people who were "Repairing the Rigging".  I mean they appear to have absolutely no fear of heights!

fullsizeoutput_55be.jpeg

I, on the other hand, found myself to be on the bring of dizziness just photographing them.  Vertigo! But I was still able to be quite strategic as I lined up my shots.  I loved all the lines from the cranes across the harbour to the rigging on the ships.  As I lined up the angles for my reference shots, I was envisioning this as a poured watercolour painting.

After the first bit of masking was applied, I quickly realized there was no additional opportunity to apply masking.  One application did the trick.

A new toy

I recently saw this exciting tool advertised in Curry's newsletter a new high precision masking fluid marker by Pebeo.  Well then, I had to order two.  Sort of love it.  It comes with an extra bit as well, unsure why but I am sure it will be revealed to me as I use it.  Unable to get quite the fine lines I was hoping for - I used to create my signature int the painting above.

And some good news

Dear Helen

On behalf of the SCA, it is my pleasure to inform you that your application for Elected Membership into the Society of Canadian Artists has been successful. Congratulations!

As an Elected Member you may use prestigious 'SCA' designation after your name, participate in the annual members’ exhibition and qualify for society awards. As well, you will receive the SCA newsletter featuring articles by members, listing calls for artists, contests, and local and regional art events, delivered to your inbox three times annually. You will also receive invitations to Society Exhibitions and other events.

Now I will be signing my paintings with SCA as well!  Very excited!

IMG_0986.JPG

A good cause

I have been asked to participate in a fund raiser for a really good cause in Saint John for P.R.O. Kids. This group provides assistance for kids in need of support to play sports, recreational, art and cultural activities.  Uncertain for certain - but do you see children playing on a beach in that window?

Cheers, until next time

Helen

 

WIP Maritime Blues

Sometimes painting is like therapy.  With this method or style of painting I can be free to do whatever.  I am developing the style with each painting. Works great for me when life is just too busy... or I feel I need to accomplish something - or I have way too many detail paintings in play.... or all of the above. I have been calling this technique poured paintings... reminds me more of batik.  The stage below is how it looks once I have removed all the layers of masking and prior to bringing out the detail.  Reminds me of a serigraph. Watercolor - mussel shellsAnyway, I start our with a solid loose drawing.  In this case, I painting the pale yellow bits prior to applying the first mask. The first wash was a mixture of Payne's Grey, Potters Pink and Genuine Rose Madder.  Apply mask. The second pour was a mixture of Cobalt blue and Neutral Tint. Mask The third pour was a mixture of Cobalt Blue, Indigo and Neutral Tint.  Mask The fourth pour was a mixture of Ultramarine Violet and Indigo. Mask The final pour was a mixture of Raw SIenna and Neutral TInt. Remove mask.  This is actually a work out. You are not supposed to abuse the paper and rub real hard.  Although the urge to climb on the painting to remove the stuff is quite hard to resist. (pardon the pun)  I did not resist.

A few key points when working with mask: Always allow for it to dry completely before you apply paint - and NEVER use a hairdryer to speed up drying time.  Remove the mask as soon as possible.   Another reason that I really like this technique is that you have to work fast to get the this point.  You run the risk of the mask not coming off or tinting the painting it you leave it on for too long. This process has taken me five days to get to the removal stage.